Comparison of antibiotic resistance pattern among Enteropathogenic bacteria isolated from broiler and backyard chicken meat

R. Yulistiani -  Doctoral Program of Agricultural Science, Graduate School of Universitas Sebelas Maret (UNS) Jl. Ir. Sutami 36 A, Kentingan Jebres, 57126, Surakarta, Indonesia
*D. Praseptiangga -  Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Agriculture, Universitas Sebelas Maret (UNS) Jl. Ir. Sutami 36 A, Kentingan 57126, Surakarta, Indonesia
S. Supyani -  Department of Agrotechnology, Faculty of Agriculture, Universitas Sebelas Maret (UNS) Jl. Ir. Sutami 36 A, Kentingan 57126, Surakarta, Indonesia
S. Sudibya -  Department of Animal Husbandry, Faculty of Agriculture, Universitas Sebelas Maret (UNS) Jl. Ir. Sutami 36 A, Kentingan 57126, Surakarta, Indonesia
Received: 17 Feb 2019; Accepted: 22 May 2019; Published: 20 Jun 2019; Available online: 20 Jun 2019.
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Language: EN
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Abstract

This study aimed to compare the antibiotic resistance patterns among original Enterobacteriaceae isolates from broiler and backyard chicken meats in Surabaya, Indonesia, isolated in 2016-2017. The Kirby–Bauer disk diffusion method was used to determine the resistance of these isolates against tetracycline (TE), gentamicin (CN), cefoxitin (FOX), sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (SXT), nalidixic acid (NA), and chloramphenicol (C). Both broiler and backyard chicken meat isolates were resistant to the six antibiotics tested. Overall, broiler meat isolates which resistant to TE, CN, FOX, SXT, NA, C were 57.76% higher than backyard chicken meat isolates. More than 50% of broiler meat isolates (304 samples) were resistant to TE and NA, whereas backyard chicken meat isolates (310 samples) were only resistant to TE. The resistant strains found in both meat isolates were Salmonella spp., Escherichiacoli, Shigella spp., Citrobacter spp., Klebsiella spp., Yersinia spp., Proteus spp., Enterobacter spp., Serratia spp., and Edwardsiella spp. Resistant strains of broiler meat isolates were significantly higher (P<0.05) than backyard chicken meat isolates, except Edwardsiella spp. Overall, multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae was found to be higher in broiler meat isolates than in backyard chicken meat isolates. Broiler and backyard chicken meats are potential reservoirs of multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae which threat to public health.

Keywords
antibiotic resistance; Enterobacteriaceae; broiler; backyard; chicken meat

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