The effect of medicinal herb on fat deposition, meat composition, amino acid and fatty acid composition of broiler meats

*U. Santoso orcid  -  Department of Animal Science, Agriculture Faculty, Bengkulu University, Indonesia
Y. Fenita  -  Department of Animal Science, Agriculture Faculty, Bengkulu University, Indonesia
K. Kususiyah  -  Department of Animal Science, Agriculture Faculty, Bengkulu University, Indonesia
O. Widiantoro  -  Department of Animal Science, Agriculture Faculty, Bengkulu University, Indonesia
S. Kadarsih  -  Department of Animal Science, Agriculture Faculty, Bengkulu University, Indonesia
Received: 20 Oct 2017; Published: 5 Mar 2018.
Open Access
Citation Format:
Abstract

The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of medicinal herbinclusion on fat deposition, chemical composition, amino acid and fatty acid ofbroiler meats. One hundred-sixty eight female broiler chickens aged 15 days were distributed into 7groups as follows: 1) broilers were fed a diet with no medicinal herb as the control (P0) 2) broilers were fed a diet with 5% Sauropus androgynus leaf powder (P1); 3) broilers were fed a diet with 5% bay leaf powder (P2); 4) broilers were fed a diet with 5% basil leaf powder (P3) 5) broilers were fed a diet with 5% papaya leaf powder (P4); 6) broilers were fed a diet with 5% Moringaleaf powder (P5) and; 7) broilers were fed a diet with 5% noni fruit powder. Experimental results showed that the inclusion of medicinal herbs significantly increased protein (P<0.01), iron(P<0.05), kalium, calcium, phosphorus, linolenic acid(P<0.01), methionine, omega 3 unsaturated fatty acid (P<0.05), but significantly reduced fat (P<0.01), glutamic acid, alanine, lignoceric acid, oleci acid (P<0.01) and omega 9 unsaturated fatty acid (P<0.05). It was concluded that Sauropus androgynus leaf was the most effectiveto produce low fat-high protein and mineral meats.

Keywords: medicinal herbs; fat deposition; meat composition; amino acid; fatty acid; broilers

Article Metrics:

Last update: 2021-02-27 21:44:07

  1. The amino acid profile of broiler chicken meat after dietary administration of bee products and probiotics

    Biologia, 75 (11), 2020. doi: 10.2478/s11756-020-00451-9
  2. Use of natural ingredients in Japanese quail diet and their effect on carcass and meat quality — A review

    Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences, 32 (11), 2019. doi: 10.5713/ajas.18.0800
  3. Modulation of the growth performance, meat composition, oxidative status, and immunity of broilers by dietary fulvic acids

    Yingming Mao. Poultry Science, 98 (10), 2019. doi: 10.3382/ps/pez281

Last update: 2021-02-27 21:44:07

  1. The amino acid profile of broiler chicken meat after dietary administration of bee products and probiotics

    Biologia, 75 (11), 2020. doi: 10.2478/s11756-020-00451-9
  2. The usefulness of fermented katuk (Sauropus androgynus) plus bay leaves to modify fat accumulation, cholesterol and chemical composition of broiler meat

    Santoso U.. Journal of the Indonesian Tropical Animal Agriculture, 44 (1), 2019. doi: 10.14710/jitaa.44.1.84-95
  3. Use of natural ingredients in Japanese quail diet and their effect on carcass and meat quality — A review

    Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences, 32 (11), 2019. doi: 10.5713/ajas.18.0800
  4. Fat deposition of broiler chickens fed a high-fat diet contained Sauropus androgynus leaf extract plus turmeric powder

    Kususiyah K.. Journal of the Indonesian Tropical Animal Agriculture, 44 (4), 2019. doi: 10.14710/jitaa.44.4.382-391
  5. Effect of turmeric and garlic supplementation to fermented Sauropus androgynus-bay leaves containing diet on fat deposition and broiler meat composition

    Santoso U.. Journal of the Indonesian Tropical Animal Agriculture, 45 (2), 2020. doi: 10.14710/jitaa.45.2.91-102
  6. Modulation of the growth performance, meat composition, oxidative status, and immunity of broilers by dietary fulvic acids

    Yingming Mao. Poultry Science, 98 (10), 2019. doi: 10.3382/ps/pez281