Extent of Collaboration in Building Academic – Service Partnerships in Nursing

DOI: https://doi.org/10.14710/nmjn.v6i2.12094

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Published: 19-01-2017
Section: Articles
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Background: There is a growing concern in the nursing service industries to expand the roles of nurses. A well-developed and planned collaboration between the academic and services in nursing is required.

Purpose: This study investigated the extent of collaboration in building academic-service partnerships based on the perceptions of the students, faculty, staff nurses, and nursing administrators.

Methods: This study employed a descriptive research design to obtain a thorough picture about the extent of collaboration in building academic and service partnerships. The majority of the participants (n=500) were staff nurses (n=232, 46.4%) from 5 hospitals, students (n=160, 32%) and faculty (n=62, 12.4%) from 7 schools who were informed, consented and selected using a purposive sampling. A questionnaire was used to describe the extent of collaboration. Descriptive statistics such as mean, standard deviation, frequency, and the percentage were used.

Results: Students, faculty, nursing administrators and staff nurses assessed the overall extent of collaboration in building academic-service partnerships to a great extent in terms of nursing education redesign, research collaboration, faculty practice, academic and clinical progression, and workforce development.

Conclusion: Despite the fact there was a great extent of collaboration in building academic-service partnerships in nursing, the proposed intervention or enhancement program can be an instrument to strengthen the current status of nursing amidst radical reforms in the healthcare delivery.

Keywords

Academic-service partnerships; collaboration; nursing

  1. Cyruz P. Tuppal 
    Adjunct Professor, St. Paul University Philippines System, Philippines Senior Clinical Tutor, Ministry of Health, Oman Honorary Tutor, Cardiff University, Oman
    Adjunct Professor, St. Paul University Philippines System, Philippines

    Senior Clinical Tutor, Ministry of Health, Oman

    Honorary Tutor, Cardiff University, United Kingdom
  2. Mark Donald Renosa 
    Science Research Specialist, Research Institute for Tropical Medicine, Philippines., Philippines
    Science Research Specialist, Research Institute for Tropical Medicine, Philippines.
  3. Said Al Harthy 
    Senior Faculty, Oman Specialized Nursing Institute, Oman, Honorary Tutor Cardiff University, United Kingdom., Oman

    Senior Faculty, Oman Specialized Nursing Institute, Oman, Honorary Tutor Cardiff University, United Kingdom.

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