Conversion of Wood Waste to be a Source of Alternative Liquid Fuel Using Low Temperature Pyrolysis Method

Gesyth Mutiara Hikhmah Al Ichsan -  Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Sebelas Maret University Surakarta, Indonesia
*Khoirina Dwi Nugrahaningtiyas -  Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Sebelas Maret University Surakarta, Indonesia
Dian Maruto Widjonarko -  Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Sebelas Maret University Surakarta, Indonesia
Fitria Rahmawati -  Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Sebelas Maret University Surakarta, Indonesia
Witri Wahyu Lestari -  Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Sebelas Maret University Surakarta, Indonesia
Received: 25 Sep 2018; Revised: 16 Jan 2019; Accepted: 23 Jan 2019; Published: 31 Jan 2019.
Open Access Copyright 2019 Jurnal Kimia Sains dan Aplikasi

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Language: EN
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Abstract

Conversion of wood waste into bio-oil with low temperature pyrolysis method has been successfully carried out using tubular transport reactors. Pyrolysis carried out at temperatures of 250-300°C without using N2 gas. Bio-oil purified by a fractionation distillation method to remove water and light fraction compounds. The materials obtained from different types of wood waste, namely: Randu wood (Ceiba pentandra), Sengon wood (Paraserianthes falcataria), Coconut wood (Cocos nucifera), Bangkirei wood (Shorea laevis Ridl), Kruing wood (Dipterocarpus) and Meranti wood (Shorea leprosula). Bio-oil products are analyzed for their properties and characteristics, namely the nature of density, acidity, high heat value (HHV), and elements contained in bio-oil such as carbon, nitrogen and sulfur content based on SNI procedures, while bio-oil chemical compositions are investigated using Gas Chromatography Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS). The maximum yield of bio-oil products occurs at 300°C by 40%. Bio-oil purification by fractional distillation method can produce purity of 16-31% wt. The characterization results of the chemical content of bio-oil showed that bio-oil of methyl formate, 2,6-dimetoxy phenol, 1,2,3 trimethoxy benzene, levoglucosan, 2,4-hexadienedioic acid and 1,2- benzenediol.

Keywords
Wood waste; pyrolysis; bio-oil; characterization

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